Thursday, December 31, 2015

WW1: French Train Guns



WW1 was dominated by the artillery that shelled positions for days. Guns on trains were not just a German weapon. The French had them too. Pictured above is a 400mm gun on rails in Le Petit Hangest.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Social Matter - Weimerica Weekly Episode 6

The sixth installment of Weimerica Weekly is up now at Social Matter. This is intended as a truly wweekly series for y'all to listen.

This week's episode covers art, the degeneracy of art, the Dada crowd winning, the CIA funding modern art, the decline, managerial revolution effects on art, and if there is an opening for art to flourish if on the right side of the spectrum.

Please listen to it there. It is 31 minutes in length.

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

A Racist Macroagression Unnoticed In New York

With the focus on microaggressions, one must stay vigilant for the next flare up on campus or in the streets. What little imaginary infraction or even hoax will cause the parade of slovenly dressed and overweight blacks of your city or school to hoot and holler for some type of handout? Even if they do not know of it, their white and Jewish handlers will make sure they know what to say and tweet for the news media. Pay attention to the ones they miss.

Right in the heart of progressive America, New York City, there was a rather strange hanging effigy that should have alarmed minorities. A custom related to Purim involves the hanging of Haman. Haman was the Biblical figure that tried to wipe of the Jews in Persia, but good Queen Esther saves the day and Haman is executed. This was a Sunday school story of good Jews who helped pave the way for Jesus to exist. Maybe this is a Christian thing to cover for the fact that Jews had a big part in killing Christ. It makes sense to honor old traditions and celebrate one's faith. What does not make sense, and this is noted in the link, is to dress Haman as if he were a 21st century New York City Gentile resident. Combined with the despicable and illegal methods that Orthodox Jews are employing the gentrify Brooklyn, this is a rather disgusting message to send.

No one cares. Who-whom works here. Knowing that it is team prog on team prog, the who that is doing the dastardly deeds is definitely higher on the prog food chain. Remember that years of "polar bear hunting", "knock out king" and feral black on white sucker punching were censored by the media until the moment blacks punched out a Jewish guy in New York. Who-whom is all that matters because the media needs to generate feelings for their aims, not relay information to the public. Feelings over facts to enrage people over the proper things when the media is not numbing their minds with Kardashian-level drivel.

For all the racist and homophobic taunts that are shown to be hoaxes, this is one that is real. This is far worse than simple words on a door as this is the direct representation of death. Those hoaxes and microaggressions are just tools in the cultural war for the progressives. It is a rather revealing fact that feces swastikas can oust a state university's leadership, but hanging effigies of locals gets zero airplay and absolutely no consequences by the perpetrators.

Monday, December 28, 2015

My 2015 Social Matter Posts

This year I reached out to the team at Social Matter and they graciously accepted my Sunday columns for weekly posting there. I try to put my meatier stuff there, but as verbose as I can get, plenty of my posts here are long reads. Thanks to the kind words of encouragement from you readers, I decided to start up podcasts (thank you sponsors). I try not to shoulder too much of a load, but fortunately, the world is such a circus that I will always have ammunition. My hope is that I'll reveal the story behind the story, reality and that you won't find anything like it anywhere else.

May

Thailand: The Coup So Quiet You Could Hear A Pin Drop - See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/05/24/thailand-the-coup-so-quiet-you-could-hear-a-pin-drop/#sthash.pMQyGHAn.dpuf
I kicked off Social Matter posts with an essay on the quiet aftermath of the Thailand coup. Proof of its success is in the silence of the West. I then covered another coup that was successful, but the social change is a more Islamic junta in power in Egypt as the Muhammad Window moves.

June

Four posts in June covered a wide variety of topics. In one on the reality of heroin addiction, I took the human interest story of one overdose and told you the reality behind the media's framing and whitewashing of the dead woman's tale. I then wrote on the long history of being the West's lackey of a politician from the old Soviet bloc. He hung out in Brooklyn between assignments doing USG's bidding. I wrote on the poly push that would follow the trans push, and within a week, we saw the mainstream media pushing poly everywhere. I wrapped up June with an essay on how progressive activists have reached a level where they are performance artists playing a scripted part.
Thailand: The Coup So Quiet You Could Hear A Pin Drop - See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/05/24/thailand-the-coup-so-quiet-you-could-hear-a-pin-drop/#sthash.pMQyGHAn.dpuf
Thailand: The Coup So Quiet You Could Hear A Pin Drop - See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/05/24/thailand-the-coup-so-quiet-you-could-hear-a-pin-drop/#sthash.pMQyGHAn.dpuf

July

Hey I managed to get a sports essay at SM. I discussed the collegiate system of sports crime and corruption. I tackled the curious case of Americans being against gay marriage but for gay civil unions and then switching to support gay marriage. Some of it was the media smearing marriage to sell you it for gays. I then wrote on the many curious connections between DC and the Sinaloa drug cartel. We picked a winner in their cartel wars and it is a dirty legacy for USG. Bringing my Hidden History series to SM, I wrote on how oil won WW2 for the allies.

August

Probably my favorite piece and the one I worked on the longest: The Structure and Genius of ISIS. Sunni Iraqis want sovereignty and figured out how to manipulate the players and situation to their advantage. I then wrote on the absurdity of America's devotion to Israel by using a slight change to statements from every major candidate for president. Before a summer vacation, I dropped a piece on how Trump is a demon of the system's design.

September

In September, I started off with a piece that has since been at Radix and at German website: Orban's Defiance. Why is he the only sane man in Europe? Look at what he did to take power. I pondered where #BlackLivesMatter will go. I also brought up how Syria gets a recycled plan that looks an awfully lot like decades old plans that Israel had for its neighbors. I wrapped up September with a Tales From Weimerica about how the media is angry that people are not sleeping with who progs want them to sleep with.

October

Aren't we all tired of the media calling anyone not in line "Hitler"? I tackled that ridiculousness. I then wrote on how to become a vassal of Uncle Sam's global system, you have to accept the pupu platter of progressivism. Sadly, I wrote on the fall from grace by Rand Paul, Icarus to the libertarians I know. Lastly, I used the first Democratic debate to discuss how Jim Webb and Bernie Sanders represent the ghosts of the Left.

November

I packed a lot into November. There was my plan for removing Saudi interest in Syria to reduce tension. I then tied all of the threads of finance and black removal to explain how Uncle Sam will move blacks to the suburbs. I followed that with more talk of our system, SCALE and scams in real estate. Discussing unspoken social welfare programs, I cited subtle underclass coddling. Lastly, I covered how the media avoids discussing how the Left and Big Biz are friends.

December

I finished the year with an essay on how the media will gladly hide the reasons for decline, even if it is in plain sight. Writing about the conflict of our time, I wrote on the elites anticipation of nationalism vs. globalism. I covered the Theranos debacle and how the media will never admit that they fell for it because Elizabeth Holmes was a woman in tech. Finally, I tackled the rough year for Christians and if they are turly ready to carry on the faith.

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Social Matter - Social Matter Christmas

My final Social Matter post for 2015 is on the subject of Christmas and Christians in general. It was a big year for them. Not in accomplishments but for the enemy to let the mask slip.
Gifts have been unwrapped, mass has been attended, carols and hymns have been sung. The leftovers and family favorites are stored in the fridge for the special week between Christmas and New Years. Christmas trees shall stand through Epiphany or come down sooner if there is urgency to return to normal. Another Christmas is celebrated. Another year is over. This year was a special year. This year marked the moment when Western Christians realized they were enemies in their own land–land they settled for kith and kin and Christ.
Be sure to check it out. VXXC is already there with a weird comment. The Joel osteen watching Christians better sharpen up, for the road ahead shall be tough.


Thursday, December 24, 2015

WW1: The European Family Fight



This is a German prisoner lighting a cigarette for a wounded British soldier. Hard to imagine our current enemies or even those of recent wars offering token gestures such as this.

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Social Matter - Weimerica Weekly Episode 5

This week's Weimerica Weekly is up now at Social Matter. Go listen to it there. It clocks in at 26 minutes.

This episode is about the war on Christmas, the odd Starbucks red cup controversy, fake outrage, campus protests and how the media needs those moments to keep their coalition primed for anything.

I hope you enjoy. There are more coming, and I even have an interview subject who graciously agreed to appear. That will all be in the coming year. My goal is interviews with people involved with these odd issues in Weimerica.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Grerp On The War On Christmas

***Note: Grerp has her take on the "War on Christmas". Instead of writing an essay on it, my Weimerica Weekly podcast this week will tackle the subject.***

It’s that time of year again, the Christmas season. Or, if you’re Catholic, it’s actually Advent, and Christmas won’t start for a few days yet, but since we pre-celebrate Christmas in America, it’s still Christmas time. What this means for you and yours, practically, is anyone’s guess because we no longer have commonly held cultural traditions when it comes to Christmas or any other holiday or much of anything, really. This is what the outrage over “the War on Christmas” is about. It’s a sort of angry nostalgia over our inability to maintain or celebrate our communities or our communal experiences.


To be honest, this year I’ve not kept up on the War on Christmas. The fracas over the cups at Starbucks not being Christmas-y enough showed up on my Facebook dash courtesy of my aunt who lives for outrage porn, but otherwise I haven’t seen anything, read anything, or talked to anyone about it. A couple of years ago I got really het up about the nativities being pushed out of all public spaces and the juvenile aggression of evangelical atheists in their attempts make all public space either Christianity free or all inclusive. Their “poisoning the well” strategy was great for angering absolutely everyone and cluttering up public spaces with ugly crap, but it wasn’t going to make a dent in Middle America where hardly anyone sees the humor in erecting statues of Satan with small children on the state capitol lawn.


The question is: is there a war on Christmas?


Many people point out that Christmas takes over everything from November on, and that anything so ubiquitous isn’t persecuted. Christmas is on television, whole radio stations are devoted to playing only Christmas music for months, and every store starts putting out its Christmas merchandise in October or even earlier. How can there be a war on Christmas?


The problem is that for many people who celebrate Christmas as a religious holiday or even a time spent socializing with family don’t view TV watching or consumer spending as part of their authentic celebration of the holiday. They see these things for what they are: attempts to get everyday people to part with their money or be shallowly entertained. It’s a clever strategy: dilute Christmas down to a message of happiness, kindness and gift-giving and anyone can enjoy it. Who doesn’t like to eat, get stuff, and delude themselves about humanity?


Christmas as a Christian holiday, however, is something that you have to make an effort to celebrate in contemporary Western society. The kind of cultural Christmas experience my parents had as children with public school pageants and Christmas carols - that’s long gone. Christmas has been made unwelcome by a small protesting minority of people who don’t want to feel left out so they force the majority to celebrate privately or not at all.  


The days when you assumed that your neighbor was doing much the same thing you were doing in your own home are gone. Now you just hope your neighbor doesn’t want to shiv you if you hang out a string of lights. The reality is that most people do like Christmas and probably enjoy seeing the lights, getting Christmas cards, and wishing (and being wished) a Merry Christmas. But the well has been truly poisoned. We’ve been forced into saying “Happy Holidays” instead for fear we’ll offend anyone by celebrating a Christian holiday in a European way. And we resent it. We resent having to share our holiday with a bunch of other minor holidays that have been pushed on us to dilute a Christian holiday and make us feel guilty for celebrating it.


Ultimately, this is a reaction to the deliberate diversification of America. People feel alienated from each other when they don’t share common beliefs, ideas, and cultural practices. We don’t fully trust each other. Hollywood and academia have been telling us for so long that we are all the same once we scrape off the false dividers of religion, race, and culture, but we aren’t. Cultures differ, values differ. We differ.


I don’t have any problem with other people celebrating their own holidays. They’re important, and they create meaning and joy in people’s lives. And when Christmas comes around, I’d like for people who don’t celebrate it to kindly keep their mouths shut and not whine and complain about it ad nauseum. Being in the room with a Christmas tree is not torture. Having to hear Christmas carols at a school program may not be meaningful to you, but it’s not hurtful. I don’t follow sports and I don’t like football, but I don’t tell everyone I know how stupid football is on Superbowl Sunday because that day is not all about me and what I like or enjoy.


The reason that this all erupts around Christmas instead of, say, Columbus Day is because of the emotional attachment we have toward the holiday. For many people some of their best childhood memories revolve around it. We might resent hearing all of the anti-white ranting on Columbus Day, but very few of us feel that the actions of a 15th-century Genoan represent us as modern Americans. If he wasn’t the greatest guy, well, what famous 15th century person was? We can dismiss it. When people treat what is a favorite holiday for many Americans like it’s something dirty and oppressive, we get angry about it.


I’ve been able to look at this more objectively over time, and I can see that, in large part, the War on Christmas as it’s promoted on FOX News is also just another way to distract and funnel the burgeoning anger of Americans to a problem that is largely unsolvable. How much would we think about this without the outrage media driving it? Probably not much. Most people are pretty busy in December.

So my solution has been two pronged. I ignore the media, and I celebrate my holiday without shame or embarrassment. I wish people well, and I forget about the rest. And on that note, Dear Reader, please have a very Merry Christmas. 

Monday, December 21, 2015

Social Matter - Desperately Seeking Susan Jobs

My weekly essay at Social Matter posted today, and it is about the media's hunt for the female Steve Jobs and what it makes them do.
Growing up, one hears the phrase “too good to be true.” While a child questions the warning or the concept, by teenage years, the lesson has been learned. It may take until adulthood to be fully understood, but the average person understands the illusion of the perfect story. Too good to be true often becomes a runaway hype train. Even after the story is proven to be a fraud or simply not as excellent as marketed, the media rarely explains why they fell for it. 

Please read it there. This tech firm she created looks like it might be a billion dollar fraud more than a world changing creation.

My Best of 2015

Last year, I grabbed a couple of essays from each month and posted them here as my "Best of 2014". Today is the "Best of 2015" as I know I have picked up a bunch of new readers. These are separate from my Social Matter posts, which will be posted next week.

January

Deep City - An examination of the politics of NYC and how there is a Deep City that occasionally shows up to correct things. I trace the path of elite clean ups of NYC back to the La Guardia days right up through Rudy's tenure. Democracy always wins and muddies the water.

Stuck in Boomer Mode, Paglia Doesn't Get Gaga - Discussing why Paglia, one of the last honest cultural critics, doesn't get Gaga. It is a generational thing. Gaga represents a change in our culture and ourselves as we become a character "on" 24/7 through the evil of social media.

Romney, the Perfect 1996 Candidate - This was a bit of a backhanded compliment to Romney for how he fit a different time, but also analysis about how the '90s were far more important than the media treats them. Many of our current problems were born through decisions then.

February

How Progressives Swallowed the Democrats - This examines the steps that the progs took to take over the Democrat party. This discusses the money route, the cleaning up of the old city machines and the importing of voters as well as breaking the old Dixiecrat-Northern alliance. The coup's start was sending FDR to the White House.

The Orchestrated Attack on Russia Failed - In the aftermath of a failed march in Russia and failed color revolution, I discussed the media and financial ways that the USG system tried to attack Russia in the winter and how those efforts failed.

March

Hidden History: How America Created the Cuban Missile Crisis - Title explains it all.

Why Are Blacks Homeschooling? - Exactly why are blacks homeschooling, and why will the media not mention the reasons? The excuses cited are phony, and you see it is high income blacks doing it. There is also a quote where a black mom says Kansas is more diverse than San Diego. Stop laughing, I cited her quote word for word. Maybe we learn the real meaning of diverse.

Grantland Joins the Porn Normalization Push - ESPN's now defunct Grantland does a paint by numbers piece on the porn AVN weekend. It misses the major changes in porn and of course, frames porn as fun, cool and feminist. A female writer was used, which adds fuel to the "they're pushing it on women now" meme.

Carving an Exit Thede Union and Apply NYC Co-op Rules Elsewhere - These two essays are on how to separate from prog-land rules. Kind of wonky, but if we can carve an exit, it is worth looking over.

April

Nixon Saw What We See - Using his own words, this explains how Nixon understood the problem of the progressive USG system.

When Nixon Calls - I steal from Safire and type out a hypothetical conversation between Nixon and I with him calling from hell. We cover just about everything.

Where Successful Lean In Ladies End Up - Here is where those eager beaver Lean In types end up at the end of their career.

The Stay At Home Mom Advantage - Here I sell you on the benefits of your wife being a stay at home mom.

May

US of 2015 = Rome of 44BC or 440 AD - Which decline of Rome do we mirror? Is it the end of the republic or the empire?

Putin is the West's Creation - Title explains it, but how the West's moves made Putin rise. The USG system in the '90s laid the groundwork for his installation at the head of the Russian state.

Secession Would Allow For Renewed Group Rituals - Secession would allow smaller communities to forge identities rather than the watered down American identity. Having more things in common will allow for groups to strengthen.

HIV/AIDS, Gays and Reality - This essay runs through the numbers to explain how 20% of gay men have HIV/AIDS and all of the other things about gays and HIV that the media skips over.

June

Those Old, Effective and Competent Racists - Detailing how the whites of South Africa wrecked Boko Haram when blacks in Africa and the West did not do anything. Their crime is showing the multikulti stuff is garbage.

A Boomer Marriage of Convenience - A fictional portrayal of the Clinton marriage on some odd night.

July

Back to the Future and Nature vs. Nurture - A long review of BTTF and how dominant the "nurture can beat nature" narrative was in our culture in the '80s. Genetics research has destroyed that.

Hypothesis on Spreading Deviancy - Deviancy works its way down the socioeconomic ladder, not up.

City Girls Arent Carrie Bradshaw, They're Elaine - The single, childless women of major cities in America are just replicating Elaine from Seinfeld's character arc.

Annex Mexico and Get It Over With - If we will open our doors forever, just annex Mexico and formalize the relationship. This would be better for everyone compared to the sick, open borders policy of today.

August

The Nixon Post-Debate Phone Call - Nixon calls up after the first GOP debate to push Trump. We make fun of Jeb and his wife too.

Erickson, Buckley, Will, and Conservative Purging - This is on the repeated purges of the right of anyone impolite who dares to not play false opposition for the left.

The Maturation of Roosh - I recount how Roosh has grown up a bit. This is a little over 6 months after we mocked him for his SJW-styled purge of his forum.

September

#NRORevolt - Explaining the reason for our revolt from NRO's leadership of the false opposition. I hope the CIA checks still clear for NRO.

Haiti vs. Dominican Republic - Is It Just White Dads? - Is the different trajectory for the two nations on one island just more white dads in the Dominican past?

Fall Soros Watch - Recounting the machinations of George Soros and how Soros Watch could be a great feature for any news outlet.

October

A Hitler They Missed - The one figure the media would never compare to Hitler who hits more check marks for similarities compared to whatever boogeyman they want to call Hitler today.

How "The Morning After" Described 2015 - Long piece that discusses feminism and the false promises and bitter fruit of its work decades ago. I review Kate Roiphe's book and how she predicted 2015 25 years ago.

Delusions of American Women: Time Magazine's 1955 Perfect Body - Let's use Facebook Mom fantasies as a way to see how warped everything is in our culture, including our perception of the past.

November

When a Russian Mafia is not a Russian Mafia - I review Tom Friedman's book on the Russian Mafia and how it really isn't about Russians as much as it is about Jews.

Who Attacked Benghazi - I lay out who might have pulled it off and why does no one in our government care?

But How Right Will Houellebecq Be? - My hope that Houellebecq turns out to be wrong with his provocative book Submission as France comes to face the decades of Islamic immigration and fresh attacks.

December

When Boomers Did Christmas Movies: Scrooged - People really seemed to respond to this piece on Scrooged reflecting the empty Boomer crowd and that specific moment in the late '80s and Boomer mid-life crisis.

Paris 11/13/15 Politicization - In this piece I covered the immediate politicization of the Paris Attacks before they were even done. It is an indicator of how politicized everything has become, even immediate tragedy.

I have posted cultural pieces and reviews of the year like this one.

Thank you all for reading. I am humbled to see ideas from this little blog spreading and thankful for all of you who send me encouragement and ideas. I never really thought I'd go from 5 readers to what this is now. If I ever go soft, let me know. I don't want to betray myself. Hey, you're not bored by the schmaltz and still here! You know I will keep churning out pieces, recording podcasts and finding the pictures of WW1 that will hopefully educate and entertain you for 2016.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Movie Review of "Star Wars Episode CopyPasta"

It's a kids' movie.

With all the hype and all the marketing at adults (product tie-ins everywhere), this is a children's movie. Disney at least treated it like a proper investment and forced JJ Abrams to drop all other projects to work on this. Similar to viewers, they must have noticed he starts a lot of things well only to get distracted and then let them rot (Alias, LOST, Star Trek). The weight of the prequel failure was heavy on Disney, so there was a desperate desire to deliver to fans. JJ Abrams himself was said to be a huge fan, so it was going to be fan friendly.

It ends up as the most derivative work in an age of derivative Hollywood productions.

The movie has a strong start. There is the classic introductory Empire scene that is darker than anything in the originals. The cool rebel, an Al Pacino look-a-like playing a pilot named Poe, is captured by the new Empire (First Order) as he gives a droid a map to get to the Resistance. Wait that sounds just like the start to the first film. Okay but that is just a wink to the originals for fanboys right? There is a conflicted stormtrooper (black lead), an escape and crash, and some interesting wasteland scenes that feel... Mad Max-ish. Everything is going well ever when they bring Han Solo and Chewbacca into it. The scene on their freighter has a good feel to it, uses sets rather than heavy green screens and feels like an homage to... the Alien series. There is a cool way JJ Abrams handles a Jedi vision sequence. Even if it is right after an homage to... the Mos Eisely Cantina scene. Wait, it's not just going to be winks and nods the whole way, right?

It is. It all goes downhill when Carrie Fisher shows up. From the moment she appears, it becomes "Ctrl + C, Ctrl + V" from the original series to the new one. They compress the action scenes from the original trilogy into the final two-thirds of this one. Ice planet scenes, desert scenes, prison escapes, blow up a shield, blow up the planet shaped weapon, a rebel base in a jungle, pulling a lightsaber from the snow, mentor death, "ticking clock on destroying the good guys", and a big blow up scene. It's "copypasta". JJ Abrams has not written shit in this. The real test is next movie. This will make bank though, and that is all Disney cares about.

It is a "popcorn" action film. Action sequences are throughout the movie with little story to make a connection between you and the characters. Did you really care if any of the new characters made it? In fact, you might have wanted to see them not. Little touches and references for the old timer fans are here. The CGI is well done, and not overused. Music is sparse at times. This is an action film. You will enjoy the action sequences. The lightsaber fght is good and not cartoonish with a great forest setting. You will enjoy Harrison Ford being the Han Solo we all remember. Ford never quite transitioned to old timer roles, but he got too old for the "NO, you listen to me!" hard ass roles he played to perfection for 20 years. If Tom Hanks was every Americans' extra lovable uncle, Harrison Ford was every Americans' extra "lovable, competent but arrested for punching out your aunts' new husband" uncle.

The galactic conflict makes no sense. No sense. There is a republic but also a First Order and a Resistance outside of the Republic? Maybe it is Weimar Germany redone with the Commie vs. Fascist battle and a helpless government being dumb. What does make "progressive sense" is that the Resistance (GOOD GUYS!!!) are diverse in human and alien form with lots of duskier humans. The Resistance even had a fat, bearded hispter fighter pilot. They only have a force of like 100 people, but they hit every progressive checkbox. The First Order (BAD GUYS!!!) are 90% white and all human. Conspicuous progressivism strikes again! I did see a couple black chicks in First Order uniform.

In a really weird and unusual bit of casting, the First Order is nearly all British people. Truly a testament to the American need to hear a British accent for villains. There were some Brits in the first trilogy, but they turned evil Brit up to "11" in this one. Making Luke-Han seem as galactic myths when they were fighting 30 years earlier was ridiculous, and a dumb gimmick. The propaganda of the Rebellion having Luke as an asset who killed the emperor and defeated Vader would have been so good, they'd have boadcast it forever. Jesus Christ, Obama brings up killing Bin Laden still and that was a mission he made a decision on and had to be tricked into greenlighting it by Leon Panetta.

The female lead is grrl power at each step. Akinokure has the best take on this as latent transgender fantasies by nerd fanboys. Never thought of it that way because I viewed it as nerd boys who desperately want a girl who is into their nerd stuff and will then have sex with them and use them since they are unskilled in the sexual arts. It is rather embarrassing. Not as embarasing as showing a very powerful Jedi throughout the film suddenly at the end taking hits from a non-Force user and then a rookie Force user. Eyeroll inducing.

Almost as eyeroll inducing as the somewhat mild romantic stuff between black lead (Finn) and girl lead (Rey, Jesus she even has an androgynous name). This might just be because nerds don't know how romance or dating occurs. Remember in Star Wars where the guys thought Leia was cute but she couldn't give a shit about them, and then hooked up with Han in the second film? It takes time and some back and forth. This film has the leads saying to each other, near goddamn strangers, within 5 minutes of meeting that "hey you need to do this because I care". It was nearly Joss Whedon omega nerd dumb. Finn is not all that annoying but stunt casting. He does do stereotypical black things like lie, steal, mutiny, con people, have no family and work in sanitation... so maybe Finn was black all along. You also could visually identify him as a specific stormtrooper since he was chubby.

The Hispanic lead was not much of a lead, and not as much of a Hispanic. He was underused. For some idiotic reason, they wrote him out of most of the movie through a nonsensical "I got lost" excuse, and wasted him this movie. He could have been useful for the "get off the planet" sequence. If he's the best pilot in the galaxy, show him flying not "girl power who doesn't know if she can fly well" flying for feminism. Also, ding ding ding you put him, black lead and female lead together, and voila you got a love triangle. There are some Hollywood tropes that work well: love triangle with equal options is one of them.

The Hispanic actor himself seems like when progs count Hispanics to show off rather than hide them in the white category (example: Hispanics marrying Whites bumps up the interracial marriage numbers). Poe did look like Scarface era Pacino, and had a bit of charisma. In another era, no one would care or notice he was Hispanic. No one would care. He'd be cast in Mafia movies after this as an Italian (think Andy Garcia). This might be how Hollywood handles Hispanics going forward. Cast Sofia Vergara and this guy types and rave about Hispanic inclusion when everyone looks at the 4 foot tall mestizos in their towns and roll their eyes at the disconnect.

Is it bad when the best character they introduced was the little robot (BB-8) that will be this generation's R2D2? I'm being serious. He is the best new character, and he is just R2D2 in a different form and a bit more animated. There is one quick BB-8 moment that got the whole audience to laugh. I take that back, the costume design and storyline for Kylo Ren is pretty good. He has a voice modifier too so he sounds menacing at times and at other times sounds like the "Prepare for total domination" line from the song Sparky Pilastri uses in "Bring It On". Visually, they nailed the design for him with a sleek, athletic looking echo of Vader that makes sense and is reinforced by the character arc.

There are some great moments for him, with his introduction and the "talk to the melted helmet and skull" scene being pretty interesting. A conflicted bad guy who had some emotional moments whether challenged or confessing was something missing from the entire prequel series. The raw anger he has is what you would expect from a young, hot headed bad Jedi. He actually comes across as they should have written Anakin in the prequels. The only problem is they cast Adam Driver and his gigantic face in that role. He really needs facial hair or else he suffers from "face pollution", which is the phennomenon where one has too much face for their head. Maybe Driver went to the dark side because of all the times he saw Lena Dunham naked on "Girls". If I had to call it now, I'd say that he will be the most popular character (Jedi + great costume design + really the lead + male).

JJ Abrams definitely has parental issues. Every single movie or show he makes has some weird parent issue. I can't imagine why (((Abrams))) has mommy or daddy issues. Every single thing he touches has that. A parent is always dying whether Alias, LOST, Super 8 or this. Yes, we get parental issues here. He still missed a huge opportunity. He had it tailor made with a plot about Han and Leia's kids as the leads, but he twisted it. Think of that set up (Solo kids), and the scenes on the Millenium Falcon of the male and female leads, and suddenly it makes more sense and feels right. They chose The Narrative over a good story.

Is it fun? Yes. Is it ever going to measure up to how you dreamed them with friends years ago? No. No goddamn way. That ship sailed when the prequels were made and botched the easiest lay ups in cinematic history (Good guy willingly goes bad for ultimate power and Obi-Wan/Amidala/Anakin love triangle). The Star Wars saga went bad in the Return of the Jedi development. In that early '80s haze, George Lucas decided to scrap making Endor a planet of enslaved Wookies with Chewbacca freeing them in favor of ewoks beating the stormtroopers as a Vietnam War allegory. Stop laughing. Lucas got lucky. JJ Abrams is someone who can start stuff and never finish things well a la Mel Brooks. This was fun, but don't get mystical on me.

These are also kids movies. You got older. You expected it to grow up with you. This is popcorn entertainment that you thought might be cooler and more serious if wrapped in some Buddhist sounding Force talk and knights with laser swords. Francis Ford Coppola said that he made Godfather about family, but if you made a movie about religion, it'd be even bigger. Lucas did that. Coppola and Lucas were friends, which is how Harrison Ford got into Lucas' films. Lucas sold an individual's religious awakening in a New Age packaging of somewhat Christian and somewhat Buddhist ideas to Americans when New Age crap was all around. He also took enough from classic action tales to make it work. It was the perfect marriage of the pirate's tale with a Western with a samurai tale with Greek themes. Ever notice in the original films there was always the wrap up with three storylines coming together: the lightsaber battle (knights/samurai), the space opera section (pirate/naval) and then the blasters a blazin' ground battle (Cowboys vs. Indians or Army). Something for every kid. Notice that JJ Abrams ended this film in the same manner. Copy and paste.

There is one thing wonderfully sentimental, and it is not the stupid nostalgia nerds and fanboys enjoy. It is something for parents. If you were a kid when you saw the originals (ages 3 to 13) and you have kids now, this is your chance. You bring the little guy or girl and go through the ritual. Tickets, popcorn, going over some basics of etiquette in the theater, talking Star Wars. I saw this when I went. Lots of dads with their kids. I brought my son. When the kids get seated and the lights dim and they get that pumped up kid energy, it hits you. It's the memory of what it was like for you, and you get to share it with them. You also remember that this is suppose to be fun. It's a silly popcorn action film. The originals were too, but with a better story. I walked back to my car thinking, "Yeah that was fun and exciting but Jesus Christ completely derivative". This is a nice moment where the experience is not just your experience, it's not just their experience, but it becomes a family experience.

Will these hold up? Who knows, and with the coming onslaught of Star Wars movie after Star Wars movie, this will be beaten into the ground. I talk to teens who say the prequels were a waste of time and did not resonate with them. All CGI and little story. JJ Abrams must be cognizant of that and fearful of following that fate. We have a no prequel embargo in my house. It won't happen with this film but that does not say much. Is it worth the money? Sure for the big screen experience, but you won't be talking about this in ten years as a game changing scifi/fantasy film. Should they have just taken the fantastic Timothy Zahn "Thrawn Trilogy" novels, adjusted the timeline and turned those into movies in the late '90s/early '00s? Yes.

But this is a Disney product... and Disney has to make that paper. Forget story, just print dollars.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Trump Thoughts + Social Matter Review and Preview 26

Trump made it through the debates without suffering any mortal wound. Did you ever anticipate anyone being able to say that? Trump is also proving that the elites are uniformly open borders, and that is the most precious project they have for destroying us little people. Here is the "moderate" Republican the media has said the GOP should push for decades, and just because he wants a wall and to deport illegals he is a far right fascist. It is revealing.

Whether he wins, loses or gets screwed by the GOPe, he has changed politics forever. He has laid out a playbook for a younger candidate to follow in four or eight years. He has shown how to manipulate the media and bring up the taboo. He has also shown the GOP for the false opposition, outer party that it is. Trump has also destroyed a Bush. Let's all pause for a moment to thank him for that.

Trump has also done something else. While those with eyes that are open know about Jewish dominance of the press, Trump has shown their ability (across the aisle) to unite against what they fear. They do not fear another Shoah. What they fear is hat a leader would not owe anything to them and would end the gravy train. With no debt to neocons, the paleocons and other GOP folks who did not play the neocon game would have a moment to take the sinecures and patronage jobs. It goes deeper. If The Right Stuff ever publishes it despite having it for two months now, you will read about a trio of usurious Jews who have a foot on one side of the law and a foot on the other side but make millions off their activities. What if Trump goes after those incredibly juicy targets that make great press and show the little guy that usurious bankers are getting it? That is what Jews fear. They know they are overrepresented in those areas, and they fear an end to the system that they have come to control.

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Last week's essay for Social Matter was on the fight between nationalism and globalism. The elites anticipated this fight. A problem for the elites is that they did not anticipate the decay of their talent and the mismanagement and fragmentation caused by their policies. The hollow world of the materialistic globalists is no match for what can be offered through group struggle. The conflict is not decided, and there are cracks in the McWorld that Ben Barber expected to easily defeat the nationalism or identitarianism.

Weimerica Weekly Episode 4 was about a variety of items. The media is catching on that America is an echo of Weimar Germany yet won't admit their responsibility. I discussed the Social Matter Forum, the Puritan Leftist hypothesis and how people can engage politically in a manner that matters.

Next Social Matter will discuss the media's desperate search for a female Steve Jobs. They though they found one, and she manipulated them yet it has blown up in their face. No lessosn learned though, and we all have no doubt they will repeat this.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

WW1: Makeshift Graves



Every war has them. The temporary, makeshift graves for the dead. Sometimes memorials or monuments build up around them. Thi was during the Battle of Morval. A makeshift grave in a shell-hole, marked by an inverted rifle driven into the ground near Combles, Fall of 1918.

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Social Matter - Weimerica Weekly Episode 4

Episode 4 is up of Weimerica Weekly at Social Matter. Go listen to it there if interested. I even have a sponsor now.

This episode focuses on the media finally catching onto the Weimar state of things. I cut this before the NY Times oped that was titled "Trump's Weimar America", which was close but totally oblivious to our social cesspool. The media of course will never accept responsibility for this. I discuss the new Social Matter Forum and my favorite thread there. I end up answering my sponsor's question about political engagement. I end with some discussion of potential post-USG fault lines.

Still clocking in at roughly 30 minutes. I do not want to waste anyone's precious time. I hope you enjoy it. Go listen to it there!

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

When Boomers Did Christmas Movies: The Santa Clause

Boomers had to break rules. They had no clue what the rules were for but they thought they knew and what they knew was that the rules were bad. Big rules, written rules, unwritten rules, old rules, new rules and small rules, it did not matter. A rule within the Christmas movie genre was there is a family, and that family learns the meaning of Christmas. If it is about a single person, they make a romantic pair or learn about the joy of having a family. Boomers had to screw everything up when they made The Santa Clause.

It's a simple comedy where a man named Scott Calvin (S.C., wink wink) finds the true meaning of Christmas with his son and the help of Santa's elves by becoming Santa himself. They decided not to go with the distant father who lost his fun side like in the film Hook. Maybe it could be a "family on a down swing who comes together for Christmas and renews bonds" movie? No. The Santa Clause goes the divorce route. Tim Allen plays a divorced dad who is required to take on the duties of Santa. The entire friction to the story and plot movements in the set up of him being Santa and his son knowing relies on divorced couple problems.

Scott Calvin has funny bits where he is unconsciously taking on the Santa role, and there is physical comedy there if that is your thing. The terrible Boomerness to it all is every single family stress point. He has an ex who has a frosty relationship with him. He himself does not have a relationship. His ex-wife remarried a psychiatrist, which is perfectly Boomer. She doesn't go to a shrink after divorce, she marries one. The child's knowledge of his father being Santa is not brushed off as childhood make-believe after a divorce but instead are delusions that could be signs of worse trouble. This is 1990s America, everything is pathologized, even small children talking about Santa.

It actually gets worse and even more Boomer. There is a dispute over the child that results in a restraining order and police involvement. Adults cannot settle things, let's call in the authorities. Now there are supernatural circumstances with it being a comedy about Santa. If that is the case though, why have the third act be about the cops, custody disputes, and a divorced couple that has not resolved everything? Why? Keep it a comedy. If you do go that route, go absurd and have a nonsensical Santa and the cops stand-off. Instead we get a realization that Santa is real for the adults, this is about Boomers remember, and the ex-wife tears up the restraining order.

This is Boomer. They think the visual of the restraining order being torn is needed for the audience, as if that paper grants supreme authority. It's a scene in a kids' movie. This is a problem of Boomers. They gave up settling things between people, couples, families and neighbors by taking to heart the creed, "I'll sue". They also falsely believe restraining orders work or matter. Yes, the mean ex-boyfriend with a temper must stay 100 yards from your daughter, but that piece of paper is not stopping him from walking up to her in her car and shooting her. Roles come with duties. Families have roles and responsibilities. Being the generation that saw women charge into the workplace, raise their kids at latch-key kids and then settle everything in court, Boomers tore those roles to shreds and made anyone still wanting to perform them feel like second class shits. It also helps men relinquish our generations old duties, "I don't have to be a protective father and beat the shit out of my daughter's ex, this piece of paper will keep her ex-boyfriend away".

This did not have to be the case. Tim Allen as a well intentioned and goofy dad was a winner in 1994 with the success of Home Improvement. Allen could play the everyman dad who might need to learn a lesson and be reminded of his duties, but when he pulled it off, made a kid feel fantastic. On Home Improvement, his scenes with Jonathan Taylor Thomas were great because besides resembling one another (great casting), they had a chemistry and acted believable with one another. No dad is perfect, and no son is perfect, but when those two reconciled or fixed a mess they had created, it felt real. A dad assuming the duties of Santa and figuring out what matters most with his son would have been gold.

Hollywood could not give us that. They had to give us a movie of Boomers divorced and fighting over their kid. It was inclusive as those divorced kids could see a movie that reflected them. It was a modern tale. If this movie reflected any reality it would have had a scene of the parents bickering over who gets Christmas night versus Christmas morning. The Hollywood illusion is not that Scott Calvin and his son performed Santa's duties on Christmas eve, but that the next morning Scott Calvin was not waking his son up early because "we need to unwrap gifts and get you back to your mom's before she yells at me". It's better than what some extended families have to endure with the every other year set up, and magically Jimmy or Jane is missing from every even numbered year Christmas family photo.

This movie has its funny moments, but misses some softballs. It doesn't even hit the easiest of funny points with kids of divorce. Hollywood missed the idea of parents one-upping each other with gifts, and kids manipulating their divorced parents into buying their kids' loyalty. Why? This movie is not about kids. It is about the parents. Boomers must always be the stars of the show. They are hitting old age now, so their deaths will be theatrical just as everything else was.

The other change in the Santa Clause was that the parents did not reconcile. There would be no reunion. The Santa Clause was a year after a similar themed movie came out, Mrs. Doubtfire, with the same message. "Divorce happens, and it definitely was not about you. Hell, if it had been about you, they would have stayed together because this divorce is obviously killing you. Kids, mom and dad are not getting back, but at least they will stop fighting for a moment and move on with their lives... and oh yeah, they love you, too."

Monday, December 14, 2015

Best Thing I Read In 2015

Once again, the men of Social matter deliver on the best of 2015. Last year, I considered the Gentrification = War article the best thing I read in 2014. I found this year's way back in January. I knew then it would be hard to top, and in my opnion, no one did. This year the "best thing I read" honor goes to Reed Perry's "The Tyranny of Suffrage". Please read it if you have not done so. It is a long read but worth the time and effort.

I loved everything about this piece. It's tone, the fun bits, and then the steady, unrelenting waves of truth that keep coming. The rock of bullshit progressive ideology will be worn down by steady waves of reality. It is such a well paced piece. I kept Perry's piece in mind when I wrote on Erick Erickson and cucks purging people. It wasn't close to his, but I tried to employ his balance of reason and emotion at my fingertips. You want to learn to write well? Read it. You want to learn how to move people? Read it. You want to educate, entertain, and make others aspire to something greater than mere polemics and partisan shlock? Read it. In our sphere, there are many pieces about the danger or stupidity of allowing women to vote. If you want to read the best one that touches on the history and tragedy of allowing women the vote, read it.

Reed Perry's essay reads like poetry at times, and it is an essay I have shared with others. In an age awash in phony male privilege arguments, it parts that sea like Moses. There are too many good paragraphs to cite any specific one. I am not going to cut and paste an excerpt. Please read it there. This was the absolute best thing I read in all of 2015, and I had to wait nearly 12 months to share it here. Reed Perry is not on twitter anymore, but if you look for him on the Social Matter Forum, you can find him.

Sunday, December 13, 2015

Social Matter - The Elites Anticipated Nationalism vs. Globalism

This week's essay at Social Matter is on the Elite's anticipation of the current battle of nationalism vs. globalism. After the fall of Soviet supported communism, they fully saw this coming challenge to globalization.

The fire rises. Not only are jihadis expressing their anger at Western universalism, but Yemenis have begun a fight against what they see as a top-down imposition of globalist aims. Yemen is not a solitary flashpoint, as Hungary, India, Russia, and China all have leaders who have expressed opposition or defiance of the globalist order. Western Europe and even the U.S. have seen stirrings of nationalist awakenings and an embrace of historical identities. Even simple pick-up artists have joined the bandwagon. The nationalist vs. globalist fight is in full swing. The rejection of the bland, 21st century progressive empire is growing worldwide. The bad news is that the global elite have anticipated this decades in advanced. 

Let's hope that this battle does not end with the imposition of bland, corporate progressivism installed everywhere. We in the West have already seen what that does to people's souls. Go read it there!

Friday, December 11, 2015

Social Matter Review and Preview 26

Last week I explained how the media will hide the decline. The prog utopia must explain the dysfunction as odd or unexpected results and hide how progs have mismanaged it. This week I will tackle the great game afoot of nationalism vs globalism. Even the PUA crowd has woken up to this one. The problem is that the globalist a have seen this coming for decades. The positive for nationalists or identarians is that the thinkers a generation ago had no idea how badly the globalist a would manage their empire.

If you are unaware, I have started a podcast on Social Matter by the name of Weimerica Weekly. It runs 30 minutes and covers topical things and the weird items that float through our social soup. Episode Three is up now and it focuses on sex, technology (Tinder and antibiotics) and STDs. Sponsorship offers are welcome and so are topic suggestions. It's a wild Weimerica out there and I can't see everything.

Thursday, December 10, 2015

WW1: Serbs Reject Germans



Portraying Germans as bloodthirsty villains is an Anglo trope for the last century. They were the same as any other fighting force. They offered terms to the Serbs who they were beating the snot out of in the fall of 1915. This involved ceding land to Bulgaria, but it would be an end to hostilities. The Serbian leadership rejected this offer and continued their retreat. As the picture describes this retreat, "a living snake with heads for scales".

Wednesday, December 09, 2015

Social Matter - Weimerica Weekly Episode 3

This week's Weimerica Weekly podcast is up at Social Matter. Please go listen to it there, and if interested in sponsoring, shoot me a note to the email listed there.
Episode 3 tackles the odd coincidence of the media reporting on an uptick in STD rates in America as well as the sad findings that antibiotic resistant bacteria seem to be popping up around the globe. I talk technology, the dating apocalypse, loosening mores and how a day of reckoning will come when antibiotics run out.

I hope you enjoy. Once again, around 30 minutes. No need to talk your ear off, but it can make for a lunch break or commute. Go listen to it there.

Tuesday, December 08, 2015

When Boomers Did Christmas Movies: Christmas Vacation

"You're the last true family man."

Are your Christmas memories focused on your home and your immediate family or are they centered on how you interacted with your extended family at your grandparents' home? Who hosted "Christmas Dinner"? I bet a jaunt to gramma and grandpa's house was in play for Christmas. Boomers had fewer children compared to their parents, so this may have accounted for it. The elder statesmen or matriarch would put on the Christmas circus performance that the Boomer kids grew up with, including food favorites and silly old '50s decorations. It was great not just for bringing a family together but to transfer traditions along the vertical generational line.

When were the Boomers going to take over the duty and power of hosting holidays? National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation attempts to answer that. Many Boomers had families, and Chevy Chase's Clark W. Griswold Jr. is your Hollywood representation of that phenomenon. Griswold represents that strain of Boomers that want to recreate the magic that Boomers grew up with. The idea of performing duties and rituals as the right thing is evident throughout Griswold's escapades. Family vacations, seeing elderly relatives, housing relatives, marrying, doing fun things with kids, staying with the mega-corp for decades, buying gifts for struggling relatives; Clark Griswold always does what he considers the right thing in the tradition he was raised. Griswold tries to accomplish some wholesome family things that he envisions are good and traditional.

While America's secularization was nearly complete in blue states, this film has some little touches to traditional family values. The Griswolds say grace before the meal. Does anyone go to church for Christmas? C'mon this is Hollywood. Still, the flyover Americans get a fair shake. Why? It is the work of John Hughes, the '80s film maven. Hughes single-handedly is why so many '80s flicks have a Midwest setting. While Cousin Eddie is the hick for laughs, there is a genuine decency behind some of his behavior. His ignorance is an innocent stupidity ("heart bigger than his head"). Hughes did this in many of his films with Planes, Trains and Automobiles spotlighting provincial or middle of nowhere types as sources of comedy but decent people. The cab driver in Planes, Trains and Automobiles can be a sight gag with his crazy cab and hairdo, but he is not a weirdo or loser. He is proud. Contrast this with newer films where rural equals dumb, mean and most likely racist/rapist/sexist/homophobe.The people of the Midwest were Hughes' people. Hughes left Hollywood, and raised his family back in the Midwest.

Two things that timestamp this '80s that really stand out but in different ways are the home decor for Casa Griswold and the SWAT team raid at the end. The home design and decor is incredibly '80s with more boxed room design and no open floor plan, and the window treatments and wallpaper are so busy and loud. This is contrasted nicely with the '80s sleek and chic look of the DINK neighbors, so all aspects of suburban, '80s home decorating are covered here. The SWAT raid at the end of the film is meant to be ludicrous. It was. Now SWAT raids on unsuspecting suburbanites are normal. Truly sad when the ridiculous is now completely normal and expected.

I love the film. From Thanksgiving to Christmas, I will watch it roughly 30 times. By mid-December, I am "off-book". I quote Clark Griswold when my family acts dumb ("It's good, it's good", "That it is Edward, that it is indeed"). I laugh at Clark and Ellen's annoyance with incompetent family members. This is life. I love to make up lyrics to the Ray Charles song and sing it in his voice to trick my wife into thinking that those are the real lyrics. I have a family full of eccentrics. This is my life for events hosted at my house. My wife is just like Beverly D'Angelo in the film, supporting me and a great rock for handling their stupidity. We both know a Christmas Vacation is in our future. Everyone couple goes through it at least once.

Can a Christmas movie be full of hot women? Of course it can. This is Hollywood. Julia Louis-Dreyfus plays the neighbor who was one half of a DINK couple. She is pretty sexy in the film with her long hair. There is the lingerie saleswoman who plays the Christie Brinkley fantasy role for Clark Griswold in this iteration of Family vacation films. She rocks the French cut panties well, and plays the straight woman for one of Chevy's finest scenes. Juliette Lewis plays the daughter, and is jailbait here, but has anyone wondered what fountain of youth she is drinking from? She has aged incredibly well, so her cute look earlier in her career has allowed her to surpass finer looking peers as they age poorly. Beverly D'Angelo makes the MILF hall of fame with her look here. The Christmas night look is fantastic, but I'd be derelict in not noting her dark '80s sweater over dark pants as deliciously MILFy.

D'Angelo is not just eye candy. D'Angelo and Chase were in their third film together as husband and wife, and the chemistry is believable. I loved the silent exchanges, facial expressions and interactions within their conversations because it is what married couples do when trying to minimize how vocal and often they slag on their ne'er do well family. The only thing missing between the two of them was an arms outstretched, eyes bugged out, shrug-shake, which is code for "Jesus Christ, can't ____ get his fucking act together". Couples do this. It's the joy of knowing one eyebrow raise means so much more. It's one additional reason why some elderly couples die within months of each other; they lost their partner in comedy. Chase and D'Angelo sell their screen marriage to viewers with these small touches. It appears believable that the Griswolds are a loving couple, and Ellen will always support Clark's adventures because she knows he has loving intentions.

Clark's intentions are genuinely focused on his family. As the quote that opens this essay explains, Clark Griswold is the last true family man. He is spending his Christmas bonus on a pool for his family. He is the classic provider. He has to endure horrible in-laws and his dad and father-in-law bickering about parking and who suffered more in WW2 (listen to background dialogue). He puts up with it because they are family. Clark finds old Christmas films in the attic. Does anyone else care? No, but he watches them, feels the pangs of nostalgia and channels that energy into his Christmas. The movie begins with the trek for the perfect Christmas tree. He is going to do it for his family even as they roll their eyes.

Clark is not just the last true family man, but knowing what we know with Hollywood tropes, he is the last competent man. Will Ferrell took over the large, physical white male comedy roles, but his performances have been an odd blend of lampooning the classic white male role and reaffirming it. Grantland spent an essay writing about just that idea, trying to say white equals obsolete in every paragraph. Movies today have savvy and smart men, but if they are white, they are going to be the villain or murky, grey and selfish executive. The females and minorities talk the grey, ambiguously good white guy into doing the right thing. Clark Griswold has plans. Yes, he has goofy antics, but he thinks big. He executes on his plans. Pay attention to work scenes. He is an engineer who designs a great product that the gruff executive discusses in a trade show presentation. Clark has a window office in a tower in downtown Chicago. Clark lives in a nice suburb of Chicago, and his wife does not have to work. Clark also has to deal with incompetents all around him. It's Clark trying to hold things together while those around him fail repeatedly.

The film's script does a nice job of offering foils to Clark Griswold. Griswold's last competent man routine is fleshed out in contrast to Cousin Eddie. Eddie is a broke, unemployed scrub who cannot provide for his kids and gets swindled out of money regularly. Clark takes him in and buys his kids Christmas gifts. Neighbor Todd, the yuppie, earns good money to afford a home in his neighborhood but cannot be a man. This is explicitly stated during the final home wrecking as Julia Louis-Dreyfus' "Margot" insults his failure to perform manly duties. Clark has an office job and can use a chainsaw. Clark Griswold may tear down the forest, but he is going to find the perfect tree. When you look at the foils, you also get the sense that Clark Griswold represents the last guy who knows right from wrong and will choose right. This last bit he has to teach to his boss, who in an anachronistic touch lives in the same suburb despite being the "big boss".

Chevy Chase is a Boomer funnyman. Born right at the beginning of the boom, Chase was a multi-talented individual that aged with the Boomers. He had an amazing ego, but when his acting was on, he earned the right to it. Something lost in our modern era of gross out humor, trash humor and other garbage, derp effects is the use of slight facial movements and expressions to full effect. Belushi is a master of this in Animal House, to the point where you have to consider "Silent Bob" from Kevin Smith films a direct rip off of Bluto. Chase was the same in that he could use his delivery, his posture, his body positioning and facial expressions to sell a joke and a scene. That peculiar effect that seems to haunt all comedians of losing their "funny" hit him hardest. I take that back, maybe Eddie Murphy lost his in a sadder fashion. Whether it is a disconnect with ground level culture or running out of gas to keep producing funny bits over and over again, it is the rare comedian who keeps his "funny". Christmas Vacation is Chase's final hurrah. It was the last moment that he was funny. After the credits rolled on Christmas Vacation, Chevy Chase was no longer funny.

It was final hurrahs all around. It was John Hughes' final hurrah. He had a blockbuster later with Home Alone, but Christmas Vacation is the last of his heavy cable rerun classics and has aged much better. It was the last definitively Hughes movie. It was the Boomers final family hurrah. Even the youngest Boomers were fully grown adults by 1989 (mid-20s). The divorces were adding up. The abortion holocaust was in the rear-view. By 1989, more families had fewer children and childless aunts and uncles in higher numbers. They could never match the genuine wholesomeness of prior generations for Christmas flicks, and as they ascended to middle aged and elder statesmen roles in families, we saw them fail. We know the fraud that they are. They still whine about their parents. Taking their elderly parents in became a burden to complain about, when in the past having a grandmother in the home was a natural part of life and a positive. They labelled themselves the sandwich generation. Boo-hoo, you have to spend time and share space with your blood relatives. If this movie represented the promise of Boomers aging into mature roles within families, it was an empty promise.

We will watch, not for the Boomers but for the aspirational goal. Clark knows this is a quest for perfection because he confronts his dad about why his childhood events were always disasters. Clark is the Boomer trying to make things right. Some of us try. If you have hosted a family Christmas, you have been in Clark's shoes. We all want a great family Christmas. We all want to relive those years when everything tasted great, egg nog was consumed in gallons and Christmas still had its magic. It's a yearning for the comfort of childhood, but a desire to give it to our children. It's a desire to give it back to the generations that set us up. Clark W. Griswold Jr. wants his family to give like he is giving. He wants them to aspire to making it a special moment, which might be too much to ask their dipshit contemporary selves to do. A Christmas spent with loved ones, some outdoors fun and that little bit of childhood belief are all we need for a good Christmas.

Monday, December 07, 2015

Paris 11/13/15 Politicization

No time to mourn, no time to pray, no time to stop for them. The beauty of our interconnected world was that immediately people could see and track where things were happening. If you had loved ones in France, you could quickly check on them. This was not 9/11 nor the London subway bombings, nor even the Madrid train bombings. Sitting in front of your television or holding your phone and following the news was interruped by the court eunuch voices. The voices that spun this immediately.

Politicization of the event was going on before bodies were cold, forget buried. This was on both sides.

See tweet here, formatting is weird on this post.

Klein was responding to a tweet from an anti-immgiration and refugee politician. This threat was the fear that those blocking the migrant settlement in Europe and America were warning about. It took less than two months to become real. This was huge for them. It was an immediate knee-jerk reaction because this was what the Cassandras called for but were called xenophobic and racist. They were right.

Klein's tweet is the faux stupidity displayed when the Left's pundits want to frame something for their gain. Never does he consider just remove the problem population because the pressing matter is to get Western countries to lock into accepting hundreds of thousands or millions of "refugees" a piece. Keep the Narrative going. Sustain the train's momentum. Frame these migrants as victims. This is all in the face of 75% of "refugees" being men, and roughly 75% of the "refugees" not being Syrian. The war in Syria cannot be the reason for Sub-Saharan African and random Middle Eastern "refugees".

These were not the sickest of tweets. Klein did double down later, but the worst tweets were far more horrifying when you think of the minds behind them. Many tweets referenced how those evil racists were going to feel right or feel emboldened. The Left then made snarky jokes about how the evil white men and rednecks are worse terrorists and a bigger threat. The obsession with making everything about domestic politics was revealed. Attacks were ongoing in France, yet American progressives were obsessed how this would affect the immigration debate or support Trump's ideas.

This is what people have become. Part of this is the setting where now we are no longer babies like on 9/11 with little experience with terrorism nor government surveillance and structure in place to supposedly deal with this. We hardly knew the Muslim threat then. We know it now; some will deny reality while others may overblow fears. The game's rules are out there, so the shock is not as harsh for some. They will not take a moment to honor the dead, to think of the families destroyed and to simply feel sad for the horrific attack that was perfectly preventable. Listen to Trump; deport now.

Since Paris, America has been touched by this same instant politicization of a tragedy. The San Bernadino shootings were reported around 2:30pm. By 3pm, the voices on the Left were gloating about white male assailants. Bwahaha, would be a good summary of the tweets. Prepared mass shooting images and thoughts were tweeted, which then created the response by the pro-gun supporters. People have fallen into this trap. Leftists like the Vox crew were pushing gun control, mocking white men and snarking all afternoon as bodies were still warm and survivors rushed to the emergency room.

This is the soulless behavior of those obsessed with politics and point scoring. It also revealed the stupidity of journalism as none of those liberal journalists listened to the police scanner like an investigative journalist would have. That is not their function, as their function is pushing court propaganda. Twitter master troll "@Ricky_Vaughn99" put them to shame by listening, relaying information and tweeting the shooter's name as the progressives metaphorically masturbated to the idea of white male shooters. The shooters also happen to be Muslims. This caused the progressive line to immediately shift from har har white men to gun control now! Forget mourning.

The Left knows their insane import Muslims policies create these events but they cannot admit it. Therefore, their immediate objective is to smear the other side and shout "Not All Muslims Are Like That" and "Religion of Peace" through Facebook, Twitter and whatever means necessary to drown out the steady, sober statement of "We told you so". They cannot admit defeat, incompetence nor simply being incorrect. Their holding of power and policy in the face of such obvious flaws infects the minds of the right to immediately show how they are right and the left is wrong because the media will never ever give their policies a chance. The Left is a suicide cult. The Left is in control. The Left never wants to admit they are wrong. This process will repeat. They will never want to give the car keys up, so they will just turn the radio up louder and drive the BMW off the cliff.

Sunday, December 06, 2015

Social Matter - The Media Will Hide The Decline

Over at Social Matter I have an essay on how the media will dutifully hide the decline all around us. The progressive system must not be allowed to be seen for the wasteland it is turning into.

Crumbling American infrastructure is starting to pop up in even developed areas. This is not an issue of ye olde dam in a backwoods region bursting to drown five yokels. There are bridges, dams and roads in even the Acela corridor of America falling apart or standing brittle, waiting for a stiff test from Mother Nature. This has been on the public's mind since the bridge collapse in Minnesota in 2007, and the New York Times is finally on it. In what looks to be a preview for the future of America, the cover up of our decline will come from the top down and be a partially engaged issue.

Please read it there. A Weimerica Weekly is on tap for Wednesday as well. This essay though is not about the abusrd, and is in fact on the important features of civilization that our leaders are letting fall into disrepair.

Friday, December 04, 2015

Social Matter Review and Preview 25

Very sad to see the terrorist attack in California this week. A horrible Christmas season awaits the families of the victims. This did not stop the Left from dancing for joy at the idea of it being white shooters and for pushing gun control within the first hour of the breaking news. No one listened to the police scanner like Ricky Vaugh (Twitter troll master), and only he was onto the shooter being a Muslim well before the press release.They had to eat crow as the shooters turned out to be Muslims. They will suffer no consequences for their foul actions.

Have you read up on the shooters and their profiles? The shooter was born in the US but claimed Pakistan as his origin, and he could barely spell proper words in English. Despite being born and raised here and having a swell government job, he could not spell environmental right in his dating profile. His wife was an active participant. Remind me again why we should let in poor Muslim women into the West? The failure of assimilation on display. While not a refugee, he is another example of why we need to remove kebab now. There is little assimilation and the populations brought in might never want to assimilate.

Last week I wrote on the lies of the Left and how the media enables this. The next two weeks I will write on the decline being hidden in plain sight by the media and the big global battle. That global battle is the nationalism vs. globalism battle that others are catching onto as the fight of today. The bad part is that the elite know this and have anticipated this for decades.

 For some reason, I can no longer cut and paste my work from SM to my blog here. If you missed "Enabling The Left's Economic Lies", go read it there.
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpufFor some reason my ability to cut and past has been dissab
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf
What is unwritten in a New York Times article is always the real story.
What they write is what they want to show you–with the goal of stirring up anger.
Even NY Times readers have been rebelling in comments sections. The NY Times’ effect on the public debate is not always political, but it can reveal the motivations behind their bias. This summer, the NY Times became angry with airline profits and mark ups.
Those rascals at the airlines are ringing up fees: bag fees, seat change fees, fees for whatever you could imagine. Oh gosh, the fees are insane. The airlines have enjoyed record profits (in absolute dollars), and dang it, their revenues are up 8% over 2 years. That is just unacceptable.
Did you click the link and see how the Times used a black guy as the frequent business traveler? This is an attempt to to make the thousands of television ads true. The airlines have increased their revenues with “tricks.” The Times never bothers to follow the fees through, like the bag fees. Fewer bags, less luggage, less luggage, lighter planes, lighter planes less jet fuel use and lower operation costs. Add in lower demand for baggage handlers, and it’s a win-win for the airlines, at it places the focus of packing back on the traveler. This is misplaced, lazy anger.
Does the Times see the odd anger over the airline industry finally having a healthy balance sheet? This is an industry at the whim of oil prices, and with oil down, they have breathing room. The Times is treating it like an evil, unearned windfall profit. This is ridiculous, especially given the history of bailouts for the airline industry. Not everyone can run the oil futures hedge game that Southwest ran for years during the oil spike of the mid-’00s. Not everyone can devote cash to such a hedge, and keep a risk mitigation scheme in house. We should be happy to see service remain the same but with a healthier industry that avoids strikes and is not on the precipice of destruction.
Something is missing from the NY Times article. Something does not make sense. If all of these airlines are jacking up fees, then there should be a huge opportunity for someone to not charge those fees and capture the market. The key of every firm is to find a way to position the firm’s products or services in a monopoly position to enjoy monopoly pricing power. Business is not designed to make everything cheaper for the customer; there are two sides of every transaction. The supply side has to have a reason to exist. Southwest has been built as the low-cost provider, so surely they would do this. Why is no one doing this?
Because mergers and acquisitions have created such consolidation in the airline industry that there are only a handful of carriers left. At least the AP knows what is going on in the industry. Here is the key section conveying the message of consolidation means less competition:
Over the past decade, mega-mergers reduced nine large U.S. airlines to four — American, United, Delta and Southwest — with the result that travelers are increasingly finding their home airport dominated by just one or two players. Over the same period, domestic airfares rose faster than inflation, and analysts believe one leading factor is the decline in competitive pressure.
It really is that simple. Less competition means more pricing power for the suppliers. With a sector like transportation, the limited players can leave markets to others for what is in effect monopoly pricing power. The NY Times conveniently left it out. Why? Reading the AP story reveals the hard truth. The government allowed these mergers and acquisitions. Our government regulatory bodies are all captured. They have gone along with every merger and every change in business structure. Who else has benefited from mergers? The big banks that advise on those mergers and offer bridge loans (at high rates) to fund them. These banks also advertise plenty in the Times and keep those positive analyst reports for the media giant. The system’s bankers need strong, centralized propaganda outlets, and the Times fits the bill. Our progressive Gospel, the New York Times, cannot be a bankrupt and floundering business.
For the Times to report the marriage of big business and progressivism would eradicate the illusion that the Left is the party of the little guy. This facade must be maintained no matter how much the opposite is true. The Left’s foot soldiers froth at the mouth over the Koch brothers, while George Soros and many other billionaires fund the Left’s pet causes and candidates. A cousin of this is the Times omitting genetics when discussing the racial test score gap. This omission is to protect the political narrative that the Left’s mandarins at the helm of the state care about the underclass that supplies them the voting muscle, which then gives them legitimacy in our media-run system. Team Obama was voted in on a swell of anti-banker sentiment, yet not a single banker is in jail seven years later. The Times will push this lie as long as possible to maintain power.
- See more at: http://www.socialmatter.net/2015/11/29/enabling-the-lefts-economic-lies/#sthash.eOdoY5Rx.dpuf